Alexander and Sima March fled to Canada after their 2011 indictment on mortgage fraud charges.

Source: Syracuse couple on the run for five years arrested in mortgage fraud case | syracuse.com

Barbara Jean Dennis, 60, Las Vegas, NV, a  former Nevada real estate agent who owned at least 12 rental properties in Nevada and Texas and filed multiple bankruptcy petitions to avoid paying the mortgages, has been sentenced to 11 months in prison, two years of supervised release, and ordered to pay a fine of $10,000 and restitution of $83,000.  She was sentenced on Tuesday, September 20, 2016 by U.S. District Judge Kent J. Dawson. Judge Dawson also entered an order restricting Dennis from engaging in real estate business during the period she is on supervised release.

Dennis pleaded guilty in February to bankruptcy fraud, admitting that she used the automatic stay provision in bankruptcy proceedings to avoid paying the mortgages, while at the same time, collecting rent from her tenants.  Dennis filed three bankruptcy petitions in the District of Nevada and two in the Southern District of Texas between August 2009 and November 2010. The filing of the bankruptcy petitions caused the bankruptcy court to issue an automatic stay, which prevented the mortgage lenders from filing foreclosure proceedings on her properties during the pendency of the bankruptcy proceedings. Dennis also delayed the bankruptcy cases by failing to appear at hearings and meetings, failing to submit supporting financial documents and other paperwork to the Court, and failing to disclose prior bankruptcy cases. In one case, Dennis filed the bankruptcy petition under a false name and failed to disclose the other petitions and the names under which they had been filed. Over the course of the fraud scheme, from Aug. 31, 2009, through Dec. 17, 2010, Dennis received at least $150,000, but not more than $250,000 in rental income.

As this case demonstrates, the fallout from the housing crisis in Nevada is still impacting federal investigations and prosecutions,” said U.S. Attorney Daniel G. Bogden for the District of Nevada in announcing the sentence.  “The prosecution of these cases typically takes years and requires a significant amount of resources. This sophisticated fraud scheme involved mortgage fraud, bankruptcy fraud, 12 properties in two states, and five bankruptcy petitions.”

The sen case was prosecuted by Assistant U.S. Attorney Kathryn C. Newman and investigated by the FBI.

 

 

Rachel Siders, 41, Roseville, California, was sentenced to 14 and a half years in prison for her involvement in mortgage fraud schemes that cost financial institutions over $17 million.

Federal juries returned verdicts in two trials, in March 2015 and December 2015 finding her guilty of multiple counts of bank fraud, wire fraud, mail fraud, making a false loan application, and committing aggravated identity theft.

According to evidence presented at the first trial, in 2008 Siders and co-defendant Theo Adams, 50, Roseville, California, applied for a home equity line of credit using his relative’s name on an underwater Roseville property owned by Adams. They submitted false tax returns in the relative’s name with significantly inflated income along with mortgage application documents with forged signatures. Siders, a notary public, falsely notarized the loan application documents, which were sent to Washington Mutual Bank. The bank relied upon the false documents to provide a $250,000 line of credit. Siders received $170,000 of the proceeds. After making minimal payments, the defendants defaulted on the loan.

According to evidence presented at the second trial, from mid-2006 through early 2008, Siders and Vera Kuzmenko, 46, Loomis, California, and other defendants engaged in a mortgage fraud scheme involving over 30 properties in the Sacramento area. They secured more than $30 million in residential mortgage loans on more than 30 homes purchased through straw buyers. The loan applications contained materially false information as to the straw buyers’ income, employment, assets, and intent to occupy the residences. Records introduced at trial showed that Vera Kuzmenko received millions of dollars, and that Rachel Siders received hundreds of thousands of dollars.

Vera Kuzmenko, was a licensed real estate agent for part of the scheme, and Rachel Siders ran the Rocklin office of the escrow company used on the majority of the transactions. She helped funnel millions of dollars to her co-defendants, which was not disclosed to the lenders.

U.S. District Judge John A. Mendez imposed the sentence.

On March 15, 2016, Judge Mendez sentenced Vera Kuzmenko to 14 years in prison. She was found guilty of multiple counts of mail and wire fraud, money laundering and witness tampering. On April 19, 2016, Theo Adams, 50, of Roseville, was sentenced to two years in prison. Previously, Judge Mendez sentenced co-defendants Peter Kuzmenko, 38, West Sacramento, California, to 19 years in prison; Aaron New, 42, Sacramento, California, to 11 years and three months in prison; Nadia Kuzmenko, 37, formerly of Loomis, California, to eight years in prison; and Edward Shevtsov, 52, North Highlands, California, to eight years in prison. They were found guilty on February 13, 2015, after a 21-day trial, of multiple counts of mail and wire fraud associated with the mortgage fraud scheme. In addition, Peter Kuzmenko, Edward Shevtsov, and Aaron New were found guilty of money laundering associated with the scheme, and Nadia Kuzmenko was found guilty of witness tampering.

The sentence today reflects the seriousness of Siders’ crimes, which included participation in two separate mortgage fraud schemes. Over the course of two years, Siders oversaw and participated in numerous fraudulent loans and diverted money into shell accounts for her own benefit. She abused her position as an escrow officer and as a notary public to make this criminal enterprise succeed,” said Acting U.S. Attorney Talbert. “The sentence imposed is a significant reminder that those who engage in such conduct will be held accountable.”

Today’s sentence sends a clear message; anyone profits from fraudulent mortgage transactions—whether by creating the scheme or facilitating it—will not escape justice,” said Supervisory Special Agent Dan Bryant at the FBI Sacramento field office. “The FBI aggressively pursues those involved in such large-scale, complex financial fraud matters to seek justice for the victims and protect the regional economy.”

Rachel Siders was driven by greed in her participation in this mortgage fraud which targeted the Sacramento area,” said Michael T. Batdorf, Special Agent in Charge, IRS‑Criminal Investigation. “Today’s sentencing is a reminder how serious our courts consider this criminal activity and our commitment in providing financial expertise to our federal partners in these types of crimes.”

This case was the product of an investigation by the Federal Bureau of Investigation and the Internal Revenue Service-Criminal Investigation. Assistant U.S. Attorneys Lee S. Bickley, Michael D. Anderson, and Matthew D. Segal prosecuted the case.

 

Denise Bruce, 56, Hingham, Massachusetts, was sentenced  for defrauding mortgage companies in connection with multiple mortgages she obtained on a single residence.  U.S. District Court Senior Judge Douglas P. Woodlock imposed the sentence of two years in prison, five years of supervised release and restitution of $2,810,497.  In May 2016, Bruce pleaded guilty to five counts of bank fraud.

Between 2004 and 2008, Bruce fraudulently obtained five mortgage loans from different banks in amounts ranging from $325,000 to $487,500 on her Hingham property by submitting false information regarding her employment history, income, assets, and debt.  Bruce also filed fraudulent discharges of mortgages with the Plymouth County Registry of Deeds to create the appearance that earlier loans had been paid in full, when in fact, none of the loans had been paid.  In total, Bruce obtained $2,129,000 in proceeds from her fraudulent loans.

United States Attorney Carmen M. Ortiz; Steven Perez, Special Agent in Charge of the Federal Housing Finance Agency, Office of Inspector General, Northeast Region; and Christy Goldsmith Romero, Special Inspector General for the Office of the Special Inspector General for the Troubled Asset Relief Program, made the announcement.  The case was prosecuted by Assistant U.S. Attorney Victor A. Wild of Ortiz’s Economic Crimes Unit.

Domonic McCarns, 41, Irvine, California, was sentenced to 14 years in prison by U.S. District Judge Kimberly J. Mueller for conspiracy to commit mail fraud for his participation in a nationwide foreclosure-rescue scam, Acting U.S. Attorney Phillip A. Talbert announced.

McCarns is the final defendant to be sentenced for a pair of schemes that lured homeowners with the promise to help them avoid foreclosure and repair their credit. Two indictments were brought in 2008. Four defendants were convicted after two jury trials, 13 defendants pleaded guilty, and now, all 17 defendants have been sentenced. On September 9, 2013, Charles Head was sentenced to 35 years in prison, and on October 29, 2014, his brother and fellow leader in the scheme Jeremy Michael Head was sentenced to 10 years in prison.

According to court documents, the defendants solicited homeowners facing foreclosure, and through misrepresentations, fraud, and forgery, substituted straw buyers for the victim homeowners on the titles of properties without the homeowners’ knowledge. These straw buyers were often friends and family members of the defendants, or were solicited on the internet. Once the straw buyers were on title to the homes, the defendants applied for mortgages to extract the maximum available equity from the homes. The defendants then shared the proceeds of the ill-gotten equity and the “rent” that the victim homeowners paid them. Ultimately, the victim homeowners were left with no home, no equity, and with damaged credit ratings.

Initially, the scam focused on distressed homeowners in California before expanding throughout the United States. In the course of the schemes, between January 2004 and June 2006, the defendants obtained over $90 million in fraudulent loans, caused estimated losses of over $50 million, and stole title to over 300 homes.

On December 2, 2013, McCarns was convicted after a five-week trial along with Charles Head, 36, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, (formerly of Los Angeles); and Benjamin Budoff, 49, Colorado Springs, Colorado. Head had been previously convicted in a trial in a nearly four-week trial in May 2013 with his brother Jeremy Michael Head, 34, Huntington Beach, California.

The case was the product of an investigation by the Internal Revenue Service, Criminal Investigation and the Federal Bureau of Investigation. Assistant United States Attorneys Michael D. Anderson and Matthew Morris prosecuted the case.

Fourteen other defendants have been sentenced:

Elham Assadi, 39, Irvine, California, sentenced to 5 years’ probation with 6 months of home detention;

Leonard Bernot, 50, Laguna Hills, California, sentenced to 18 months in prison;

Akemi Bottari, 36, Los Angeles, California, sentenced to 3 years’ probation with 6 months of home detention;

Keith Brotemarkle, 51, Johnstown, Pennsylvania, sentenced to 5 years, 10 months in prison;

Benjamin Budoff, 49, Colorado Springs, Colorado. sentenced to 4 years in prison;

Joshua Coffman, 37, North Hollywood, California, sentenced to 20 months in prison;

John Corcoran, 61, Anaheim, California, sentenced to 4.5 years in prison;

Sarah Mattson, 33, Phoenix, Arizona, sentenced to 3 years’ probation with 3 months of home detention;

Omar Sandoval, 36, Rancho Cucamonga, California, sentenced to 4 years and 10 months in prison;

Xochitl Sandoval, 37, Rancho Cucamonga, California, sentenced to 8 months in prison;

Lisa Vang, 31, Westminster, California, sentenced to 3 years’ probation;

Andrew Vu, 38, Santa Ana, California, sentenced to 6 months in prison with 6 months of home detention;

Justin Wiley, 37, Irvine, California, sentenced to 18 months in prison, and

Kou Yang, 40, Corona, California, sentenced to 4 years in prison.

Acting U.S. Attorney Phillip A. Talbert said, in announcing the sentence: ‘This scheme purposely targeted the financially vulnerable during their time of greatest distress with promises of help. The defendants tricked the victims into handing over their most valuable assets, their homes. Few economic crimes are more reprehensible. This final sentence in this case will bring some measure of justice for their victims.”

In large fraud schemes like the one devised by Charles Head, we can’t forget about the individual homeowners who comprised the millions of dollars in losses,” said Monica M. Miller, Special Agent in Charge of the Sacramento division of the FBI. “Today’s sentencing ends an investigation that has been ongoing for more than 10 years and brings some closure to the innocent people who were victimized by Head’s callous scheme.”

Dominic McCarns and his co-conspirators assured innocent homeowners across the country facing foreclosure that they could turnaround their misfortunes and keep their homes,” said Michael T. Batdorf, Special Agent in Charge, IRS-Criminal Investigation. “However the defendants had other plans which resulted in one of the most harmful mortgage fraud schemes in the country. The sentence handed down today by the court is befitting of this defendant and his actions.”

Mehdi Moarefian, also known as “Michael Miller,” 37, Irvine, California, was sentenced by U.S. District Judge Stefan R. Underhill in Bridgeport, Connecticut, to 52 months of imprisonment, followed by three years of supervised release, for participating in an extensive mortgage loan modification scheme. Moarefian also was ordered to pay restitution in the amount of $2,390,496.59.

According to court documents and statements made in court, Aria Maleki, Moarefian and others jointly operated a series of California-based companies that falsely purported to provide home mortgage loan modifications and other consumer debt relief services to numerous homeowners in Connecticut and across the United States in exchange for upfront fees. The defendants did business, at various times, as “First Choice Financial Group, Inc.,” “First Choice Financial,” “First Choice Debt,” “Legal Modification Firm,” “National Freedom Group,” “Home Care Alliance Group,” “Home Protection Firm,” “Hardship Center,” “Network Solutions Center, Inc.,” “Premiere Financial Center,” “Premiere Financial,” “Rescue Firm,” “International Research Group LLC,” “Hardship Solutions,” “American Loan Center,” “Loan Retention Firm,” “Clear Vision Financial,” “Green Tree Financial Group,” “Green Tree Financial,” “Enigma Fund, Inc.,” “National Aid Group,” “Southern Chapman Group LLC,” “Save Point Financial,” “Best Rate Financial Solutions,” “Best Rate Financial Solution,” “Best Rate Financial,” “Best Rate Finance Group,” “Nation Star Financial,” and “Nation Star Fin Group.”

Maleki presided over the entire structure of this scheme, and Moarefian was a senior member of the sales team. Acting as representatives of the above-named entities, Moarefian and other co-conspirators cold-called homeowners and offered to provide mortgage loan modification services to those who were having difficulty repaying their home mortgage loans. The defendants charged homeowners fees that typically ranged from approximately $2,500 to $4,300 for their services. To induce homeowners to pay these fees, the defendants falsely represented that the homeowners already had been approved for mortgage loan modifications on extremely favorable terms; the mortgage loan modifications already had been negotiated with the homeowners’ lenders; the homeowners qualified for and would receive financial assistance under various government mortgage relief programs, including the Troubled Asset Relief Program and the Home Affordable Modification Program; and if for some reason the mortgage loan modifications fell through, the homeowners would be entitled to a full refund of their fees.

In fact, the homeowners had not been preapproved for mortgage loan modifications with lenders, mortgage loan modifications had not been negotiated with the lenders, homeowners had not qualified for and did not receive any financial assistance through government mortgage relief programs, and homeowners did not receive a refund of their fees upon request. Few homeowners ever received any type of mortgage loan modification through the defendants’ companies, and few homeowners received refunds of their fees.

Participants in the scheme used pseudonyms and periodically changed their business and operating names to evade detection. The defendants also directed homeowners to mail their checks to addresses and mail boxes that the defendants and their co-conspirators had set up in states other than California.

As a result of this scheme, more than 1,000 homeowners suffered losses totaling more than $3 million.

The investigation revealed that the top tier of salesmen, including Moarefian, were paid based on commission and typically earned 45 percent to 50 percent of the final fee, after $750 to $1,000 was taken by Maleki for administrative costs.

On January 21, 2016, a grand jury in New Haven, Connecticut returned an indictment charging Maleki, Moarefian and five other California residents with conspiracy and fraud offenses related to this scheme. The defendants were arrested on January 26, 2016.

On February 17, 2016, Moarefian pleaded guilty to one count of conspiracy to commit mail and wire fraud.

Maleki pleaded guilty to the same charge and, on July 18, 2016, was sentenced to 112 months of imprisonment. He also forfeited approximately $350,000 that investigators seized from various bank accounts, approximately $362,000 sized from a Bitcoin account, a $100,000 cashier’s check, and a 2013 Ferrari 458 Italia.

Deirdre M. Daly, United States Attorney for the District of Connecticut, made the announcement. The matter was by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security – Homeland Security Investigations, U.S. Postal Inspection Service, Office of the Special Inspector General for the Troubled Asset Relief Program (SIGTARP), U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development – Office of Inspector General, Federal Housing Finance Agency – Office of Inspector General, and Federal Bureau of Investigation, with assistance from the Oklahoma Attorney General’s Office.

The case is being prosecuted by Assistant U.S. Attorney Avi M. Perry.

Serj Geutssoyan, also known as “Anthony Kirk,” 34, Santa Ana, California was sentenced to 52 months of imprisonment, and Daniel Shiau, also known as “Scott Decker,” 30, Irvine, California, was sentenced to 58 months of imprisonment for their role in an extensive mortgage loan modification scheme. Geutssoyan and Shiau also were ordered to serve three years of supervised release and pay restitution in the amount of $2,390,496.59.

According to court documents and statements made in court, Aria Maleki, Geutssoyan, Shiau and others jointly operated a series of California-based companies that falsely purported to provide home mortgage loan modifications and other consumer debt relief services to numerous homeowners in Connecticut and across the United States in exchange for upfront fees. The defendants did business, at various times, as “First Choice Financial Group, Inc.,” “First Choice Financial,” “First Choice Debt,” “Legal Modification Firm,” “National Freedom Group,” “Home Care Alliance Group,” “Home Protection Firm,” “Hardship Center,” “Network Solutions Center, Inc.,” “Premiere Financial Center,” “Premiere Financial,” “Rescue Firm,” “International Research Group LLC,” “Hardship Solutions,” “American Loan Center,” “Loan Retention Firm,” “Clear Vision Financial,” “Green Tree Financial Group,” “Green Tree Financial,” “Enigma Fund, Inc.,” “National Aid Group,” “Southern Chapman Group LLC,” “Save Point Financial,” “Best Rate Financial Solutions,” “Best Rate Financial Solution,” “Best Rate Financial,” “Best Rate Finance Group,” “Nation Star Financial,” and “Nation Star Fin Group.”

Maleki presided over the entire structure of this scheme, and Geutssoyan and Shiau were senior members of the sales team. Acting as representatives of the above-named entities, Geutssoyan, Shiau and other co-conspirators cold-called homeowners and offered to provide mortgage loan modification services to those who were having difficulty repaying their home mortgage loans. The defendants charged homeowners fees that typically ranged from approximately $2,500 to $4,300 for their services. To induce homeowners to pay these fees, the defendants falsely represented that the homeowners already had been approved for mortgage loan modifications on extremely favorable terms; the mortgage loan modifications already had been negotiated with the homeowners’ lenders; the homeowners qualified for and would receive financial assistance under various government mortgage relief programs, including the Troubled Asset Relief Program and the Home Affordable Modification Program; and if for some reason the mortgage loan modifications fell through, the homeowners would be entitled to a full refund of their fees.

In fact, the homeowners had not been preapproved for mortgage loan modifications with lenders, mortgage loan modifications had not been negotiated with the lenders, homeowners had not qualified for and did not receive any financial assistance through government mortgage relief programs, and homeowners did not receive a refund of their fees upon request. Few homeowners ever received any type of mortgage loan modification through the defendants’ companies, and few homeowners received refunds of their fees.

Participants in the scheme used pseudonyms and periodically changed their business and operating names to evade detection. The defendants also directed homeowners to mail their checks to addresses and mail boxes that the defendants and their co-conspirators had set up in states other than California.

As a result of this scheme, more than 1,000 homeowners suffered losses totaling more than $3 million.

The investigation revealed that the top tier of salesmen, including Geutssoyan and Shiau, were paid based on commission and typically earned 45 percent to 50 percent of the final fee, after $750 to $1,000 was taken by Maleki for administrative costs.

On January 21, 2016, a grand jury in New Haven returned an indictment charging Maleki, Geutssoyan, Shiau and four other California residents with conspiracy and fraud offenses related to this scheme. The defendants were arrested on January 26, 2016.

Maleki, Geutssoyan and Shiau each pleaded guilty to one count of conspiracy to commit mail and wire fraud.

On July 18, 2016, Maleki was sentenced to 112 months of imprisonment. He also forfeited approximately $350,000 that investigators seized from various bank accounts, approximately $362,000 sized from a Bitcoin account, a $100,000 cashier’s check, and a 2013 Ferrari 458 Italia.

The other four defendants also have pleaded guilty and await sentencing.

The announcement was made by Deirdre M. Daly, United States Attorney for the District of Connecticut. The sentencing judge was U.S. District Judge Stefan R. Underhill. The case is being prosecuted by Assistant U.S. Attorney Avi M. Perry. The matter is being investigated by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security – Homeland Security Investigations, U.S. Postal Inspection Service, Office of the Special Inspector General for the Troubled Asset Relief Program (SIGTARP), U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development – Office of Inspector General, Federal Housing Finance Agency – Office of Inspector General, and Federal Bureau of Investigation, with assistance from the Oklahoma Attorney General’s Office.

 

Stevie McDonald, 41, Winter Haven, Florida has pleaded guilty to making false statements in a mortgage loan application. He faces a maximum penalty of 30 years in federal prison. A sentencing date has not yet been set.

According to court documents, on November 10, 2007, McDonald entered into a contract to purchase a home in Port Richey, Florida. He then applied for a mortgage loan from Washington Mutual Bank. In the loan documents that he signed and submitted to the bank, McDonald made false statements about his income and his employment. In December 2007, during the course of the closing on the property purchase, Washington Mutual paid more than $35,000 to a woman McDonald knew and later married. This payment was purportedly a satisfaction of an existing lien on the sale property. Subsequent investigation revealed that no such lien existed. Washington Mutual Bank suffered a financial loss as a consequence of McDonald’s default on this loan.

United States Attorney A. Lee Bentley, III made the announcement.  The case was investigated by the Federal Bureau of Investigation. It is being prosecuted by Assistant United States Attorney Jay L. Hoffer.

James Mulholland, 59 and Thomas Mullholland, 59, have been sentenced to 10 to 20 years in prison on eight felony convictions by District Judge William Collette for running an $18 Million Ponzi scheme. The prison sentences for all eight convictions will be served concurrently with the maximum being 10-20 years.

These two men abused the trust they were given for their own personal gain and today’s sentence is long overdue,” said Michigan Attorney General Bill Schuette in making the announcement. “The sentences today will not repay the life savings they stole, but it will stop these brothers from ever doing this again.”

They were found guilty in a jury trial in front of Judge Collette at Ingham County Michigan District Court on August 9, 2016.

Thomas and James Mulholland started their business, Mulholland Financial in 1987. They bought real estate to be used as rental properties mostly in college towns. At the height of their business Mulholland Financial managed $22 million worth of highly leveraged real estate however they were not prepared for the recession in 2008.

Starting in 2009 until they filed for bankruptcy in 2010, the brothers raised almost $2 million from investors. They made no mention that their business was in trouble and promised a 7% rate of return from the real estate profits and that the principal and interest were guaranteed and could be liquid within 30 days of making a written request.

In reality almost every month from January 2009 to February 2010, Mulholland Financial lost money and new investor money began being used to pay off earlier investors. The Mulholland brothers knew the business was losing money and consciously decided to purchase more property in an attempt to get themselves through the crash. To do so, they increased their attempts to procure investors. At the end of 2009, they reached out to previous investors and urged them to reinvest. They again said there would be a guaranteed 7% return and they also indicated that 2009 had been their best year ever, not revealing any of the financial problems they were facing.

Mulholland Financial was forced to file for bankruptcy in February of 2010 due to overwhelming debt. By this time there were multiple investigations being conducted into the business practices. The case sat dormant with another agency until spring of 2016 until Schuette’s office picked up the case. Over 250 investors lost $18.3 million.

All the victims have been identified and were listed in various bankruptcy pleadings. The Attorney General is seeking $208,000 from the Mulholland brothers in restitution. Under Michigan law,  restitution can only be ordered in counts charged that result in conviction. All victims received some proceeds from their 2010 bankruptcy.

The Mulholland brothers were sentenced on all eight charges as follows. All charges will be served concurrently:

  • One count of Criminal Enterprises – Conducting, 10-20 years in prison
  • One count of Conspiracy to Commit Criminal Enterprise – Conducting, 10-20 years in prison;
  • One count of False Pretenses -$20,000 Or More But Less Than $50,000, 100 months -15 years in prison;
  • One count of False Pretenses – $1,000 Or More But Less Than $20,000, 3-5 year sin prison;
  • One count of Blue Sky Laws- Fraudulent Schemes/ Statements, 6-10 years;
  • One count of Securities Fraud, 6-10 years;
  • One count of Blue Sky Laws Offer/Sell Unregistered Securities, 6-10 years; and,
  • One count for Violation of the Securities Act, 6-10 years.

Spenser Iatridis, 30, Scottsdale, Arizona, was charged by Information with Conspiracy to commit mail and wire fraud on August 26, 2016 in the United States District Court for the District of Arizona.

According to the Information, Daphne Iatridis aka Daphne Trilling, aka Daphne Telles, 57, Scottsdale Arizona has been a real estate agent in Phoenix, Arizona for 18 years and Arthur Telles, 57, Scottsdale, Arizona, her husband, is also a real estate agent.  Brendyn J. Iatridis, aka Brendyn Trilling, 26, Scottsdale Arizona is the son of Daphne and also a real estate agent.  Spenser  is also a real estate agent and is the son of Daphne and brother of Brendyn.

Daphne, Telles and Brendyn were charged separately.

In 2008, Daphne was a designated listing agent for Fannie Mae REO properties.  Daphne knew that neither she nor her relatives could purchase the properties she marketed and sold for Fannie Mae and that Fannie Mae had certain restrictions that agents had to comply with in order to purchase an REO property they were listing.

Unbeknownst to Fannie Mae, the Iatridises purchased 28 properties for their own purposes.  They did this by purchasing 18 of the properties in the name of Spenser’s aunt, Anastasia Cole.  Spenser knew that Cole did not provide her permission to purchase the properties in her name and was not compensated in any manner for the purchases. Spenser knew that Brendyn falsely notarized Cole’s name by either forging her signature or cutting and pasting a known signature onto documents.  On each of the properties purchased, defendants falsely listed Cole as the trustee of a trust that they designated.  Once they had purchased the properties, they transferred them into the name of a deceased relative in order to conceal their ownership.  When Brendyn was notified that federal agents wanted to review his notary book, he misrepresented that it had been lost or stolen.

Defendants also committed a similar fraud with respect to at least nine homes that Brendyn purchased in the name of Brendyn Triling.  The defendants cut and pasted the signatures of known notaries on the documents.

Defendants committed the same fraud by purchasing homes in the name of Sing Lea Trust with Jung Won Lee as the trustee.  Jung Won Lee was Spenser’s former girlfriend.  Defendant forged her signature and falsified notarized documents to complete the purchases.  They later transferred the properties to a trust under their control.

Defendants also submitted false invoices for repairs and rehabilitations of the properties to Fannie Mae.

Once they obtained the properties, Defendants installed renters for the purpose of obtaining rental income.  Because they were concealing their ownership of the properties, Spenser knew that they intentionally failed to report the rental income on their tax returns.