Miami Combo Of Mortgage Fraud, Marijuana And Money Laundering

admin —  January 16, 2009 — 4 Comments

Manuel Pupo, a/k/a Tata, Elieser Pupo, Serguey Pupo, Elmer Pupo, a/k/a Elmes, Maritza Perez, Noel Albanes-Gomez, Omar Cardenas, Zenaida Rodriguez and Magalys Fajardo, a/k/a Magalys Rodriguez, all currently of Miami, Florida, were indicted for their roles in a diverse scheme to defraud lenders, among others.

As set forth in the Indictment, from on or about March 2, 2004, and continuing through about May 1, 2008, Manuel Pupo, a/k/a Tata, Elieser Pupo, Serguey Pupo, Elmer Pupo, a/k/a Elmes, Maritza Perez, Noel Albanes-Gomez, Omar Cardenas, and Zenaida Rodriguez were the buyers and sellers of real estate in St. Lucie County, Miami-Dade County, Lee County, Columbia County, and Marion County, Florida. At least ten of the houses were purchased through fraudulent mortgage applications, and after purchase, were used and maintained as marijuana grow houses. The defendants made false representations of material facts in mortgage applications, thereby causing mortgage companies to issue mortgages for the purchase of 18 houses.

The Indictment further alleges, on a number of the fraudulent transactions, the loan officer was defendant Magalys Fajardo, a/k/a Magalys Rodriguez, who was employed by mortgage brokers, LendAmerica Home Loans, Bluetrust Capital, and Monster Mortgage, Inc. As part of the mortgage lending process, the defendants, via Magalys Fajardo, a/k/a Magalys Rodriguez, allegedly submitted fraudulent Uniform Residential Loan Applications, Requests for Verification of Employment, Requests for Verification of Deposit, IRS Forms W-2, payroll stubs, bank statements, as required by the mortgage lenders, through the mortgage broker to the lender for review and credit worthiness approval. The aggregate dollar amount of all loans procured fraudulently by the defendants from the mortgage lenders exceeded six million dollars.

Finally, the Indictment alleges that defendants conducted money laundering transactions in an effort to conceal the source of the money and continue to promote the illegal activity. In addition to the criminal charges, the Indictment seeks to forfeit any proceeds that the defendants received from the marijuana grows and the mortgage fraud.

The Indictment charges conspiracy to manufacture and possess with intent to distribute more than 1,000 marijuana plants, in violation of Title 21, United States Code, Sections 841(a)(1) and 846; 5 counts of manufacturing and possessing with intent to distribute varying numbers of marijuana plants, in violation of Title 21, United States Code, Section 841(a)(1); 5 counts of maintaining a place to manufacture and distribute marijuana, in violation of Title 21, United States Code, Section 856(a)(1); conspiracy to commit mail fraud, in violation of Title 18, United States Code, Section 1349; 15 counts of mail fraud, in violation of Title 18, United States Code, Section 1341; conspiracy to commit money laundering, in violation of Title 18, United States Code, Section 1956; 14 counts of money laundering, in violation of Title 18, United States Code, Section 1956; and related forfeitures.

If convicted, the conspiracy to manufacture and possession with intent to distribute 1000 or more marijuana plants counts carry a statutory maximum penalty of 10 years’ to life imprisonment; the manufacturing and possessing with intent to deliver 100 or more marijuana plants counts carry a maximum penalty of 5 years’ to 40 years’ imprisonment; the manufacturing and possessing with intent to distribute more than 50 marijuana plants carry a statutory maximum penalty of 5 years’ imprisonment; the conspiracy to maintain a place to manufacture and distribute marijuana counts carry a statutory maximum penalty of 20 years’ imprisonment; the maintaining a place to manufacture and distribute marijuana counts carry a statutory maximum penalty of 20 years’ imprisonment; conspiracy to commit mail fraud counts carry a statutory maximum penalty of 20 years’ imprisonment; and the mail fraud counts carry a statutory maximum penalty of 20 years’ imprisonment.

R. Alexander Acosta, United States Attorney for the Southern District of Florida commends the investigative efforts of the Port St. Lucie Police Department, the Drug Enforcement Administration and the Internal Revenue Service. The case is being handled by Assistant United States Attorneys Carmen Lineberger, Diana Acosta and Antonia Barnes.

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4 responses to Miami Combo Of Mortgage Fraud, Marijuana And Money Laundering

  1. Oscar Ordenana April 22, 2011 at 1:51 pm

    We have been recieving letters regarding bluetrust capital lcc regarding our initical mortagewith them, then thsi was sold to another bank , letters state we could sue ang get compensation. is this legal, does this company still exist , we will grateful for some guidance

  2. Port St Lucie Movers July 10, 2009 at 6:47 pm

    This is very similar to what happened in an episode of the show “Weeds” where homes were purchased for the purpose of acting as grow houses. I didn’t think this actually would happen in real life and on such a large scale.

  3. They are Cuban, dry foot, legal

  4. Anybody know if these perps were legally present in the US when the crimes described were committed?

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