Archives For forged reconveyance

Veronica Washington was charged by information in the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia and plead guilty to conspiracy to commit bank fraud.

According to the information, Washinton purchased residential real estate at 123 57th Street SE, Washington D.C. on February 20, 2008 and obtained two mortgage loans for approximately $470,000 total from SunTrust Mortgage. By 2009, she had failed to maintain timely mortgage payments and, in February 2010, she entered into a HAMP trial period plan.  By May 2010, she was again behind on her mortgage payments and, on May 7, 2010, a Notice of Foreclosure was filed with the DC Recorder of Deeds.  In April 2013, SunTrust Mortgage began the process of foreclosure.

Sometime before October 2, 2013, according to the information, two fake Certificates of Satisfaction of the mortgages were recorded which represented SunTrust had been paid and that Washington owned the property “free and clear.” The satisfactions contains forged signatures of someone purporting to be an individual authorized to sign for SunTrust Mortgage.

On or about October 11, 2013, Washington listed the property for sale for $425,000 – even though she owed in excess of $470,000 on the two SunTrust mortgages.  On or about November 10, 2013, Washington agreed to sell the property to a buyer for $379,000.  After signing documents to complete the sale in December 2013, the title company wired Washington the sales proceeds of over $337,000.

The charges to which Washington pled guilty carry a maximum possible sentence of 5 years in prison and a $250,000 fine.



Mazen Alzoubi, real estate investor, 32, Rancho Cucamonga, California, pled guilty to conspiracy, mail fraud and identity theft, admitting that he orchestrated a scheme to steal title to Southern California homes and then sell the properties to unsuspecting buyers before the true owners could put a stop to the sale.

Alzoubi admitted that from May 2012 through August 2014, he and several co-conspirators fraudulently sold or attempted to sell at least 15 homes worth more than $3.6 million. On at least ten occasions, Alzoubi admitted, he was successful—earning illicit proceeds of nearly $2.2 million, which he then laundered and diverted to overseas bank accounts to ensure that the fraudulently-obtained proceeds could never be recovered. Continue Reading…

Kurt Sanborn, 48, formerly of Dracut, Massachusetts, was sentenced to 27 months in prison.

In May 2003, Sanborn used a private $500,000 loan to buy a home in Manchester, New Hampshire.  In exchange, the private lenders received a first mortgage on the Manchester property which was recorded at the Hillsborough County, New Hampshire, Registry of Deeds.

In October 2003, Sanborn asked a mortgage company for a $685,000 loan to buy a second home in Gilford, New Hampshire.  The mortgage company agreed to finance the transaction if it received first mortgages on the Manchester and Gilford properties.  To deceive the mortgage company, Sanborn caused a mortgage discharge that contained the private lenders’ forged signatures to be filed with the Hillsborough County Registry of Deeds.  Sanborn’s conduct involving interstate wire communication and documents that were delivered by the U.S. Postal Service as part of the fraud served as the basis for wire and mail fraud charges.

Sanborn was also charged with bank fraud based on his conduct, in February 2004, in acquiring a $150,000 loan from a federally insured bank in exchange for a second mortgage on the Manchester property.  Sanborn concealed from the bank the private lenders’ mortgage on the Manchester property.

In October 2004, Sanborn sold the Manchester property without disclosing the private lenders’ mortgage on the property to the new owners.  He then used the proceeds of the sale to make a $185,000 payment to the mortgage company and to fully repay the $150,000 loan from the federally insured bank.

Sanborn pleaded guilty to the charges in May 2014.

The sentence was announced by Acting United States Attorney Donald Feith. The case was investigated by the United States Postal Inspection Service.  It was prosecuted by AUSA Robert Kinsella.

John Michael DiChiara, 57, Nevada City, California; James C. Castle, 51, formerly of Santa Rosa, California; Remus A. Kirkpatrick, 58, formerly of Oceanside, California; George B. Larsen, 54, formerly of San Rafael, California; Laura Pezzi, 59, Roseville, California; Larry Todt, 63, formerly of Malibu, California; and Michael Romano, 68, Benicia, California, were charged by a federal grand jury in a 42-count indictment, with conspiracy, bank fraud, false making of documents, and money laundering in connection with a mortgage elimination scheme. Tisha Trites, 49, San Diego, California and Todd Smith, 44, San Diego, California, pleaded guilty to related charges before U.S. District Judge Garland E. Burrell Jr. on September 4, 2015.

DiChiara was arrested in Cool, California. Pezzi and Romano were arrested at their homes. The other four defendants listed in the indictment have yet to be arrested. Continue Reading…