Archives For Pennsylvania

Barry Horrow, 68, Glenn Mills, Pennsylvania, pled guilty to 4 counts of bank fraud.

As part of his guilty plea, Horrow, a Certified Public Accountant who owned and operated his own accounting company, Horrow and Associates, which operated in both Delaware and Chester Counties, admitted that he committed bank fraud by helping one of his clients, George Barnard of Newtown Square [(who owned Capital Financial Mortgage Corporation (“CFMC”)] and who was charged previously in an indictment with various offenses stemming from a $13 million fraud scheme who owned) to defraud lenders into issuing mortgages for 3 multi-million dollar New Jersey Shore beach mansions and a yacht based on false tax returns, false audit reports, and other false information. Horrow admitted that he repeatedly provided false tax returns for Barnard to submit to lenders on which Horrow inflated Barnard’s income by hundreds of thousands of dollars, when Horrow knew that the lenders were going to be relying upon the inflated income figures in approving Barnard’s loan requests.

Horrow faces a maximum sentence of 120 years’ imprisonment, a five-year period of supervised release, a $4,000,000 fine, a $400 special assessment, and a likely advisory sentencing guideline range of 41 – 51 months’ imprisonment. Horrow also agreed, as part of his plea, to make restitution of over $2,965,000.

The plea was announced by United States Attorney Zane David Memeger. The case was investigated by the Federal Bureau of Investigation, the Department of Housing and Urban Development, Office of Inspector General, and the Internal Revenue Service, Criminal Investigative Division, and is being prosecuted by Assistant United States Attorney Michael S. Lowe.

George Barnard, 45, Newtown Square, Pennsylvania, was indicted and charged with 24 counts of wire fraud, four counts of bank fraud, and three counts of filing a false tax return.  The indictment alleges that Barnard, who from 2005 to March 2013 was one of the two owners of Capital Financial Mortgage Corporation (“CFMC”), based in Delaware County, Pennsylvania, and also was the owner of several title companies, defrauded banks out of almost $13 million dollars and instead of using the money to fund mortgage loans for borrowers and pay off the borrowers’ existing mortgages, he took the money for his personal benefit, including buying yachts, luxury cars, multi-million dollar beach homes in Avalon, New Jersey, and paying the salary of a yacht captain. The indictment further alleges that in order to continue to have access to a large pool of money to fund his extravagant lifestyle, Barnard orchestrated a massive fraud scheme, which included selling other banks the mortgages that CFMC had written and representing to the lenders who purchasing those mortgages that they were first mortgages, when in reality they were worthless second mortgages.

The indictment alleges that while the tax returns Barnard filed with the IRS showed hundreds of thousands of dollars in losses, in reality Barnard had more than $2,300,000 in unreported income, and in order to convince other banks to issue mortgage loans to him so he could purchase yachts and multi-million dollar beach homes, Barnard gave false tax returns to the banks with inflated income figures, and on at least one occasion, told the bank that he was buying the beach home for more than $3,000,000 when in reality the sales price was $2,000,000. The indictment alleges that Barnard was able to conceal this deception by using his own title company to handle the closing of that loan and falsifying closing documents.

The indictment alleged that as a result of Barnard’s actions, lenders suffered losses of more than $12,700,000, and more than 25 borrowers who obtained refinance loans from CFMC were stuck with two mortgages on their homes after Barnard’s companies failed to pay off the borrowers’ existing first mortgages.

Barnard faces a maximum sentence of 669 years’ imprisonment, a five-year period of supervised release, a $12,300,000 fine, a $3,300 special assessment, and a likely advisory sentencing guideline range of 135 – 168 months’ imprisonment.

The indictment was announced by United States Attorney Zane David Memeger. The case was investigated by the Federal Bureau of Investigation, the Department of Housing and Urban Development, Office of Inspector General, and the Internal Revenue Service, Criminal Investigative Division, and is being prosecuted by Assistant United States Attorney Michael S. Lowe.

Janna Nassida, 45, West Mifflin, Pennsylvania, and James Nassida, 48, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, were charged by a federal grand jury in a two count indictment with wire and bank fraud conspiracy.

According to the indictment, from 2002 to 2008 James Nassida and his sister Janna Nassida knowingly conspired with other individuals known to the grand jury to defraud lenders and consumers. James and Janna Nassida worked at Century III Home Equity, a mortgage broker firm. The fraud scheme involved the submission of loan applications to lenders that contained material misrepresentations about the borrowers’ financial conditions, such as inflating borrowers’ incomes and assets. James and Janna Nassida, along with others who worked at Century III, also submitted bogus supporting documentation for the misrepresentations contained in the applications, as well as appraisals that overstated the values of the properties serving as collateral for the loans.

The law provides for a maximum total sentence of 60 years in prison, a fine of $2,000,000 or both.

The indictment was announced by United States Attorney David J. Hickton.  Assistant United States Attorney Brendan T. Conway is prosecuting this case on behalf of the government.

Anthony R. Angelo, 69, Philadelphia Pennsylvania, was charged  by Information with wire fraud and bank fraud.

The Information alleges that Angelo was the owner of Aracor Search & Abstract Services, Inc., a title company that provided real estate title insurance services and transactions, located in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.  Because Ararcor was in debt, Angelo caused funds from dedicated escrow accounts to be used to pay off other escrow obligations and operating costs, causing a loss of over $1 million to the victims.

If convicted the defendant faces a maximum possible sentence of 70 years in prison, a $1.5 million fine, a five-year period of supervised release and a $300 special assessment.

The case was investigated by Federal Bureau of Investigation and is being prosecuted by Assistant United States Attorney Daniel A. Velez.

Real Estate Fraud: Victims of Ignacio Beato Fraud Seek Help

Dozens of residents in Hazleton are seeking for help after being scammed by a real estate agent who was at the same time their community leader. They all bought their houses from Ignacio Beato, who turned out to be selling homes with fraudulent deeds.

The Greater Hazleton Real Estate Association says there are about 50 complaints against Beato, a licensed real estate agent.

Fryar, mother decline to take stand

The lawyers defending former Eagles player Irving Fryar and his mother, Allene McGhee, against mortgage fraud charges rested their case in a Mount Holly courtroom Tuesday without calling any witnesses.

Fryar, 52, of Springfield Township, Burlington County, and McGhee, 74, a retired school bus driver from Willingboro, both decided against taking the stand to testify after the prosecution completed its case and the jury trial entered its third week. The two are charged with conspiracy and theft by deception in connection with a $1.2 million mortgage scheme involving six banks and one lending company in South Jersey and Philadelphia between October and December 2009.

Fryar trial witness: Ex-Eagle’s mother unaware of alleged scam

The mortgage fraud trial of a former Eagles player and his 74-year-old mother took an unexpected turn in a Mount Holly courtroom Thursday when the key prosecution witness admitted during cross-examination that he told a prosecutor that he did not believe the woman was aware she was participating in an illegal scheme.

William Barksdale, a mortgage broker already serving a sentence for conspiracy to commit wire fraud, was testifying at the trial of Irving Fryar and Allene McGhee. The state Attorney General’s Office contends they were coconspirators with Barksdale in defrauded seven lending institutions in South Jersey and Philadelphia of more than $1.2 million in 2009.

Broker tells his side against Irving Fryar and mother

A financial broker who is serving time in federal prison in connection with a $2 million mortgage scheme took the stand Wednesday in the conspiracy trial of ex-Eagle Irving Fryar and his mother, Allene McGhee, in the Burlington County Courthouse in Mount Holly.

William Barksdale is the key witness in a high-profile case in which the state Attorney General’s Office alleges Fryar and McGhee conspired to defraud six banks and a mortgage company of more than $1 million in 2009. Barksdale, of Levittown, had pleaded guilty to conspiracy to commit wire fraud for assisting Fryar, McGhee, and several other Burlington County clients with the scheme.

A friend of mine approached me about using my credit to help people who were losing their homes. If you’re born into a life of service, this is the kind of stuff that you do.

Pennsylvania State Senator Anthony Williams, explaining his involvement in a foreclosure rescue

Michael P. Bernick, 51, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, a former bank director, was sentenced in federal court to 144 months of imprisonment on his conviction on nine counts of misapplication and theft of funds by a bank director. Bernick did not complete any loan applications, sign notes, or provide security for the monetary advances, yet received more than $350,000.

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