Husband and Wife Charged with Short Sale Fraud

Allison Tussey —  June 13, 2013 — 1 Comment

Cynthia Hosbrook, 41, currently a licensed real estate agent in Nevada, and Robert Hosbrook, 51, formerly a licensed real estate agent in Nevada, both of Henderson, Nevada, have been charged in U.S. District Court with conspiracy and fraud for making false statements to Wells Fargo Bank in order to get it to approve a short sale on their home.

The defendants are charged in a criminal indictment dated June 12, 2013, with one count of conspiracy to commit bank fraud and one count of bank fraud.

According to the indictment, the Hosbrooks allegedly solicited a relative to act as a straw buyer for their residence at 2704 Mallard Landing, Henderson, Nevada. In a short sale contract dated March 2, 2010, and in other paperwork submitted to Wells Fargo Bank, the Hosbrooks falsely represented that the sale of their home would be an arms length transaction, that it was between two unrelated parties, that no party to the contract was a family member or business associate, that there were no agreements that the seller would remain in the property as a renter, and that the short sale did not constitute straw buying, when they allegedly knew that they were selling the residence to a relative and a straw buyer.

The Hosbrooks also allegedly caused the relative/straw buyer to falsely sign a title company form on July 9, 2010, stating that the relative would be residing at the property, which the Hosbrooks knew was a false and fraudulent representation.

Cynthia Hosbrook and Robert Hosbrook have been summoned to appear for an initial hearing and arraignment on June 21, 2013, at 3:00 p.m. before U.S. Magistrate Judge Carl W. Hoffman. If convicted, they face up to 30 years in prison and fines of up to $1 million on each count.

Daniel G. Bogden, United States Attorney for the District of Nevada, announced the charges.

The case is being investigated by the Federal Housing Finance Agency Office of the Inspector General, and is being prosecuted by Assistant U.S. Attorney J. Gregory Damm.

 

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Allison Tussey

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One response to Husband and Wife Charged with Short Sale Fraud

  1. Wow, why would they do this with a short sale? If there goal is to get out of an upside down loan it seems like they could just sell to any buyer. Why have the relative involved? And aren’t short sellers not responsible for the deficiency anyway? If that’s the case, then you would think they would just sell to anybody regardless of the sales price. Or was there goal to try to continue living in the home?

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