Man Jailed for his Role in Mortgage Relief Scam

Allison Tussey —  February 24, 2015 — Leave a comment

Ray Jan Kornfeld, 59, Las Vegas, Nevada, was sentenced by United States District Judge Troy L. Nunley to 5 years in prison for his role in a large-scale mortgage fraud scheme.

Kornfeld was also ordered to pay over $3 million in restitution to victims of the scheme.

According to court documents, between January 7, 2010, and August 20, 2013, Co-defendant Alan David Tikal was the principal behind a business known as KATN, which targeted distressed homeowners throughout California and the nation, many of whom did not speak English.  Members of the scheme promised to reduce victims’ outstanding mortgage debt by 75%, falsely claiming Tikal was a registered private banker with access to an enormous line of credit and the ability to pay off homeowners’ mortgage debts in full.  Homeowners were told that in return for various fees and payments, their existing loan obligations would be extinguished, and the homeowners would then owe new loans to KATN in an amount equaling 25% of their original obligation.  In reliance upon misrepresentations made by Tikal and others, homeowners stopped making payments on their existing mortgage loans and many lost their homes to foreclosure as a result.

In fact, the defendants never satisfied the home owners’ mortgage debt and merely pocketed the money received through the scheme, which consisted of more than $5,800,000 in fees and monthly payments.  Over 1,000 homeowners were victimized.

Judge Nunley found that Kornfeld joined the conspiracy in September of 2010.  Kornfeld corresponded frequently with victims, reminding them to make their payments, and assuring them the program would be successful even after Alan Tikal was indicted by State and Federal authorities for his role in the scheme.  Moreover, after promising federal authorities on November 27, 2012 that he would contact and advise the victims to make alternative plans to address their mortgage debt, Kornfeld instead continued to collect payments and file bankruptcy documents to further the scheme.

Co-defendant Alan Tikal was convicted following a bench trial and is scheduled to be sentenced by Judge Nunley on March 5, 2015.  Co-defendant Tamara Tikal previously entered a guilty plea and is awaiting sentencing.

United States Attorney Benjamin B. Wagner and California Attorney General Kamala D. Harris jointly announced the sentence.

This case is a joint prosecution by the United States Attorney’s Office for the Eastern District of California and the California Attorney General’s Office.  It is the product of extensive investigation by the Special Inspector General for the Troubled Asset Relief Program (SIGTARP), Internal Revenue Service – Criminal Investigation, the California Department of Justice, and the Stanislaus County District Attorney’s Office. Assistant United States Attorney Philip Ferrari and Deputy Attorney General Maggy Krell are prosecuting the case.

“Kornfeld falsely promised these victims, many of whom didn’t speak English as their first language, that he could save their homes from foreclosure and reduce their mortgage debt by 75 percent if the homeowners agreed to pay him fees and regular ‘loan’ payments instead of making their monthly mortgage payments,” said Christy Romero, Special Inspector General for TARP (SIGTARP).  “Despite having the opportunity to stop his crime, Kornfeld kept the elaborate fraud going, frequently corresponding with victims, reminding them to pay up, while assuring them the operation would be successful.  Many victims subsequently lost their homes to foreclosure.  The scam also exploited bankruptcy law as a way to illegally halt foreclosure proceedings by mortgage lenders, including TARP recipients.  SIGTARP and our law enforcement partners will ensure that perpetrators of fraud related to TARP are brought to justice for their crimes.”

Be Sociable, Share!

Allison Tussey

Posts Google+

No Comments

Be the first to start the conversation.

Leave a Reply

Text formatting is available via select HTML.

<a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong> 

*